The History of Abortifacients

The peacock flower (or flos pavonis) is an arresting plant, standing nine feet tall in full bloom, with brilliant red and yellow blossoms. But it's more than beautiful; it's an abortifacient, too. One of the most striking records of the plant comes from German-born botanical illustrator Maria Sibylla Merian who, in… » 11/21/14 5:41pm 11/21/14 5:41pm

Why don't we know more about the long-term effects of abortion?

Though abortion is one of the most contested medical practices in U.S. history, we know shockingly little about how this simple outpatient procedure affects women. There are almost no scientific studies on what happens to women who receive abortions, and even fewer on what happens to women who are unable to get them.… » 4/18/12 1:49pm 4/18/12 1:49pm

What do reproductive rights have to do with careers in science?

Over at American Scientist, Wendy M. Williams and Stephen J. Ceci describe the extreme gender imbalance in scientific careers in America, where women hold, on average, only 4.4 to 12.4 percent of full professorships in scientific fields. This imbalance is not nearly as marked in Europe and Asia. What's keeping… » 3/06/12 4:30pm 3/06/12 4:30pm

What does science fiction tell us about the future of reproductive…

If everything from technology to politics will be different in the future, then so will human reproduction. That's why so much science fiction deals with the question of how humans make babies — or don't make them — in alternate worlds that are often quite close to our own. It's also why reproduction is a political… » 2/22/12 3:05pm 2/22/12 3:05pm