The Game You Can Play to Help Cancer Research

Cancer Research UK's latest foray into citizen science is in the form of the game Even the Odds. Just spend some time trying to save the Odds and you can also help researchers gather data on cancer cells. » 3/12/15 3:30am 3/12/15 3:30am

Words of Praise For Microfilm, An Overlooked But Essential Library Tool

There are some great research-minded tumblrs out there — I highly recommend JSTOR's — the Muncie, Indiana Public Library is celebrating technology month in February. They asked their local history librarians what they thought the best technology was. They were big fans of microfilm. » 2/23/15 11:00pm 2/23/15 11:00pm

If you've noticed the amount of science news in your Facebook feed is on the uptick, here's one reason why: in a survey of nearly 4,000 scientists, 87 percent agreed that "participation in policy debates and engagement with citizens and journalists is necessary to further their work and careers." The study also found… » 2/15/15 1:30pm 2/15/15 1:30pm

Melanie's Marvelous Measles Is A Book For Children That You Can Buy

Melanie's Marvelous Measles is a book about how awesome it is to catch the measles. Children ages 4-10 are invited to learn that the measles is actually pretty fun, has no serious possible side-effects, and is something kids should look forward to getting. » 2/04/15 1:40pm 2/04/15 1:40pm

This Chart Shows The Worst Diseases That Don't Get Enough Research Money

Do the diseases that claim the most years of our lives really get the most research funding? This chart takes on that question — and reveals which diseases we may need to focus more on. » 1/16/15 2:40pm 1/16/15 2:40pm

Gates Foundation Will Require All Its Research To Be Freely Accessible

Do you believe that scientists should make their research open, so that anyone can read and learn from it? Then this news will make your day. » 11/21/14 1:20pm 11/21/14 1:20pm

Is Influencing an Election "Political Science Malpractice"?

So here's an important question: How badly designed and how many obvious laws do you have to break in your study before you stop and re-design it? And is the resulting effect on elections malpractice? » 10/29/14 3:30am 10/29/14 3:30am

Meet the New Underclass: People With Ph.D.s in Science

Once upon a time, newly-minted science Ph.D.s would get research jobs at a senior scientist's laboratory, to train and hone the ideas they would explore at their own labs. But now the supply of post-doctoral students is outpacing demand, creating a new, hyper-educated underclass. » 10/08/14 4:30pm 10/08/14 4:30pm

You Have Better Taste Than You Realize

The old "tongue map" from our elementary school textbooks has been roundly debunked. Experimental confirmation of "umami" expanded Westerners' traditional four basic tastes—sweet, sour, salty, and bitter—into five. But did you know those 5 basic tastes might actually be 6 . . . or 7, 8, or more? » 9/17/14 6:10pm 9/17/14 6:10pm

Blood Of 2 Million Babies Found In Indiana Warehouse

For over 20 years, the state of Indiana hoarded the blood of newborns without their parents' consent. If your child was born in Indiana after 1991, chances are his or her blood sample is one of an estimated 2.5-million specimens currently stored in a warehouse, the location of which state officials have not disclosed. » 7/19/14 2:00pm 7/19/14 2:00pm

This Weird Morphing Skin Could Make Future Vehicles Super Aerodynamic

This strangely alive-looking blob isn't a prop from a sci-fi movie. It's a smorph, a morphing material that could make the cars, trains and airplanes of tomorrow extremely aerodynamic, using the same trick that helps golf balls fly faster and straighter. » 6/28/14 5:25pm 6/28/14 5:25pm

Here's What Happens When A Pigeon Tries To Fly In Zero Gravity

The United States Air Force set up the Aerospace Medical Research Laboratories to determine what would happen to our astronauts before we launched them into space. A brief documentary from the dawn of the Space Age is a fascinating timecapsule of early research, accomplishments, and fears. » 6/07/14 7:10pm 6/07/14 7:10pm

Soviet Doctors Cured Infections With Viruses, and Soon Yours Might Too

In the Soviet Union, western antibiotics couldn't make it past the Iron Curtain. So Eastern Bloc doctors figured out how to use viruses to kill infectious bacteria. Now, with antibiotic-resistant bugs vexing doctors, that eerie yet effective method might come our way. In post-antibiotic world, infection cures you! » 6/07/14 4:51pm 6/07/14 4:51pm

I'm A Man Who Plays As A Woman In Games, And I'm Definitely Not Alone

I self-identify as a straight male-bodied dude, but recently I've taken to playing as a female-bodied character in many games. It's not something the majority of people do, but it's also not uncommon. Oddly, however, men play as women far more than women play as men. Let's break down why people choose the avatars they… » 5/16/14 3:27pm 5/16/14 3:27pm

Why There's So Much Confusion Over Health and Nutrition

If you believed the internet, you'd think there's huge debate over whether eggs, coffee, or salt are good or bad for you. In reality, there's significant agreement on diet and health issues among experts, but the general public is conflicted. So why are we so confused when experts agree? Let's clear the air. » 5/07/14 12:24pm 5/07/14 12:24pm

Sharknado 2 Will Sponsor Shark Conservation Research And You Can Help

The studio that brought you such beloved classics as MegaShark vs. Giant Octopus, MegaShark vs. Crocosaurus, and SharkNado, is now working on an epic sequel of Great White proportions, SharkNado II: The Second One. And if you contribute to their crowdfunded "bonus scene," you can help shark conservation science. » 4/09/14 9:42pm 4/09/14 9:42pm

The world's oldest cancer is 11,000 years old -- and contagious

Scientists have finally unlocked the sequence of the world's oldest surviving cancer — an 11,000-year-old, sexually-transmitted genital cancer that still affects dogs today. » 1/24/14 8:00am 1/24/14 8:00am

How to Argue About Research You Don't Like: A Flowchart

Via WaPo's Wonkblog comes the definitive guide to critiquing research findings that rub you the wrong way. And while this chart refers more specifically to studies on things like health and budget policy, it works surprisingly well for scientific studies, as well. » 9/12/13 12:40pm 9/12/13 12:40pm

How is the sequester affecting science in America?

The Federal Government's budget sequester has left the nation's science and technology funding at its lowest in years. As predicted, labs are ditching projects and scientists; researchers are looking overseas for jobs and funding; health initiatives are being hamstrung; and federal agencies across the board are… » 9/10/13 8:30am 9/10/13 8:30am

Mind-Controlled Pong is One Step Toward a World Cup Kickoff

Controlling games with brainwaves is a vogue research subject—Patricia Hernandez herself tested out a demo that involved tossing trucks telekinetically—but a team of researchers have applied it to a competitive game—Pong—with the goal of allowing a paralyzed person to make the ceremonial kickoff of the 2014 World Cup. » 6/22/13 6:50pm 6/22/13 6:50pm