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This 1965 Soviet Documentary About Lunar Colonization Is Astounding

The Space Age gave birth to some absolutely beautiful visions of space exploration and life in space — including a ton of lovely artwork from Soviet creators. And one of the most striking Soviet works of space-age futurism came in 1965, in a documentary called Luna or Moon. The whole beautiful thing is online, with… » 8/20/14 11:40am Today 11:40am

CIA Analysis Of The War Of 1812 Finds Same Failures That Led To 9/11

This month is the 200th anniversary of the British capture of Washington, DC, and the torching of the White House. How did this disaster happen, despite ample warnings? A CIA analyst who pored through historical documents blames the same types of intelligence failures that preceded Pearl Harbor and September 11th. » 8/12/14 1:00pm 8/12/14 1:00pm

Back In 1909, They Were Already Trying To Define Science Fiction

There are so many competing definitions of "science fiction" that we could be here all day arguing about which one is correct. But back in 1909, a writer named Maurice Renard wrote an essay explaining the nature of the "scientific marvelous," a genre that he traced to H.G. Wells, and before him Edgar Allan Poe. » 8/07/14 3:30pm 8/07/14 3:30pm

Black And White Photos From The First World War, Now In Color

To commemorate the World War I centenary, the Open University enlisted a photograph restoration expert to painstakingly colorize black and white images found in archives around the world. Staring at us from across a century, the people in the images convey iconic moments on battlefields and at the home front. » 8/07/14 7:00am 8/07/14 7:00am

Scotland's Mysterious Petroglyphs Are About to Become Visible Again

Created by people living 5,000 years ago in Scotland, the Cochno Stone is a beautiful example of ancient European "cup and ring" carving. These are created by making grooves and indentations in the rock, creating vast, swirling patterns that may have guided rivulets of liquid during ceremonies. » 7/18/14 4:02pm 7/18/14 4:02pm

The Most Popular Sport in North America 900 Years Ago

Beneath the freeways of East St. Louis in Illinois there lie the ruins of a city built nearly a millennium ago, around towering earthen pyramids. Today called Cahokia, it held as many as 40 thousand people, and their influence spread throughout the southeast U.S. — mostly due the popularity of a game called chunkey. » 7/14/14 11:18am 7/14/14 11:18am

The Confederacy Almost Had a Helicopter During the Civil War

The American Civil War was probably the first truly modern war in that technology was so important. The military use of balloons, the development of steam-powered ironclads and monitors (as well as the invention of the gun turret), rifled cannons of unprecedented size, submarines, guncotton and telegraphy were all… » 7/12/14 9:30am 7/12/14 9:30am