How A French Fashion Helped Beat An 18th-Century Anti-Vaxxer Movement

When the smallpox vaccine was first introduced in the 18th century, not everyone was eager to get inoculated. Many French people were suspicious of the new procedure, which was banned in Paris for five years. But after a celebrated royal inoculation, a new fashion helped advertise vaccination and ease vaccination… » 1/21/15 3:40pm 1/21/15 3:40pm

Oregon Was Founded As a Racist Utopia

When Oregon was granted statehood in 1859, it was the only state in the Union admitted with a constitution that forbade black people from living, working, or owning property there. It was illegal for black people even to move to the state until 1926. Oregon's founding is part of the forgotten history of racism in the… » 1/21/15 11:24am 1/21/15 11:24am

The Dark and Twisted History of the Children's Friend Society

The Children's Friend Society is among the most misleadingly-named charities in history. Supported by wealthy Londoners in the 1800s, the group promised to "do something" about the appalling abundance of vagrant children in England. And they did do something: the children disappeared. What came next was horrifying. » 1/06/15 10:55am 1/06/15 10:55am

America's Biggest Cities, Back When They Were Tiny Villages

Everything had to start somewhere — and the biggest cities in the United States are no exception. New York City, Chicago, Houston and other huge metropolises were once beautiful, charming villages. Check out the earliest known maps and images of the quaint little towns that became massive conurbations. » 12/24/14 3:00pm 12/24/14 3:00pm

The Real Story Behind the 1914 Christmas Truce in World War I

It was 100 years ago this very night that something miraculous happened along the Western Front. After months of bitter fighting, soldiers on both sides gathered in no-man's-land in a spontaneous show of peace and goodwill. Here's what happened on that historic day — and why it marked the end of an era. » 12/24/14 11:00am 12/24/14 11:00am