How Lord Byron's Scandals Led Ada Lovelace To Become A Mathematician

Ada Lovelace is now most famously known as the mother of computer science, but during her lifetime, she was also well known on account of her famous father: Lord Byron. Although Ada never met her father, his scandalous behavior had a profound effect on how she was raised — on a strict diet of mathematics. » 4/17/15 8:00am Yesterday 8:00am

The "Heroic Translators" Who Reinvented Classic Science Fiction In China

When early science fiction novels were first translated into Chinese, the translators took a lot of liberties with the material, reinventing Jules Verne for Chinese readers. Author Ken Liu (The Grace of Kings) explains how this helped inspire him, in turn, to reinvent Chinese traditions for Western fantasy readers. » 4/10/15 8:00am 4/10/15 8:00am

An Eye-Opening Look At The Sudden Rise Of Private Armies

When you hear the name Blackwater, you think of gung-ho, well paid, trigger-happy military contractors who cause international incidents. This isn't entirely inaccurate, but it's not the full story, which is told through a new book by Sean McFate: The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What They Mean for World Order. » 4/01/15 4:16pm 4/01/15 4:16pm

Hilarious TV Ads From The Dawn Of The Home Computer Era

The computer revolution didn't come into people's homes overnight. There was a long period when the public was still discovering all the things they could do if they owned a computer — and this led to some truly outrageous TV ads. Check out the most hilarious and creative classic home computer ads ever made. » 3/26/15 3:29pm 3/26/15 3:29pm

The Scientist Who Wanted To Bring A Death Row Inmate Back From The Dead

Dr. Robert E. Cornish is probably best known for his 1930s revivification experiments with dogs, in which he claimed to bring dogs back from clinical death. He wanted to try a similar procedure on humans — and when a death row inmate volunteered, Cornish petitioned the state of California to let him play re-animator. » 3/18/15 1:00pm 3/18/15 1:00pm

8 Short-Lived Religious Manias That We're Lucky Didn't Stick Around

All kinds of manias have gripped the public mind, from time to time. And that definitely includes religious manias. Luckily, some of the most intense, and intensely scary, religious movements were also some of the most short-lived. Here are eight religious movements that were flashes in the pan. » 3/18/15 9:35am 3/18/15 9:35am

How The Great French Wine Blight Changed Grapes Forever

One hundred fifty years ago, the Great French Wine Blight nearly wiped out an industry that today produces some 40 billion bottles of wine a year. The only solution was a radical fusion of species that remains essential to the success of the wine market. Here's the story of how humanity hacked the wine grape. » 3/17/15 11:39am 3/17/15 11:39am