[Correction] Huge Piece of SpaceX Debris Washed Up in UK

A piece of the disposable fairing from a SpaceX launched washed up on the UK coast. While original reports identified it as part of the SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket that exploded catastrophically shortly after liftoff in June, closer investigation reveals it’s part of a successful cargo run from September 2014. »Yesterday 6:30pm11/29/15 6:30pm


The first spacecraft that feels from the future will blast off soon

SpaceX just got its first crewed spaceship contract from NASA for the Crew Dragon spacecraft and it’s set to bring us back to space on American spaceships after so many years without. Along with the Boeing Starliner, the Crew Dragon will start making crewed space flights in 2017. For reference, the last flight of the… »Wednesday 3:30pm11/25/15 3:30pm

Dammit, Congress: Just Buy NASA its Own Space Taxi, Already

Ever since the shuttle program ended, NASA has been paying Russia to ferry U.S. astronauts to the International Space Station. But the price-per-seat aboard Russia’s spacecraft has gotten ridiculous. The solution is clear and cost-effective: The US needs its own space taxis. So why won’t Congress pay for it? »8/21/15 2:20pm8/21/15 2:20pm

The SpaceX Launch Explosion Explained in Geeky Detail With MS Paint

To non-rocket-scientists (and those who don’t play Kerbal Space Program), discussions of rocket science can sometimes get a little overly technical. To fully explain what we know about the SpaceX explosion in a non-PhD way, here’s some Paint-quality graphics. http://gizmodo.com/a-single-weak-... »7/22/15 4:30am7/22/15 4:30am

These Astronauts Will be the First to Launch With SpaceX and Boeing

NASA Thursday named the first four astronauts who will fly on the first U.S. commercial spaceflights in private crew transportation vehicles being built by Boeing and SpaceX – marking a major milestone towards restoring American human launches to U.S. soil as soon as mid-2017, if all goes well. »7/10/15 2:30pm7/10/15 2:30pm

Last Night's Routine Rocket Launch Was Thankfully Routine

Last night saw the launch of a resupply mission to the ISS atop a Russian Progress rocket — a pretty routine event (as far as firing things into low-earth orbit will ever be routine), but an important one given recent events. Thankfully, it seems like everything went fine and nothing exploded this time around. »7/03/15 11:00am7/03/15 11:00am