​Recreation of Richard III's Skeleton Shows Why He Was Called an Imp

Tourists visiting the Richard III Visitor Centre in Leicester can gaze into the empty grave where the king's skeleton was discovered in 2012. His actual bones are being reinterred in Leicester Cathedral. But a 3D-printed replica is there, revealing details such as the late monarch's twisted spine and mortal wounds. » 7/29/14 3:30pm Today 3:30pm

The U.S. Economy Is A Casualty Of NSA Surveillance Programs

Ever since Edward Snowden revealed the true extent of the National Security Agency's surveillance methods, the public debate has focused mostly on issues of privacy and national security. But new evidence shows that the fallout from the NSA backlash is wider than we thought, and could cost U.S. companies billions. » 7/29/14 1:30pm Today 1:30pm

Play Spacewar!, The Pentagon-Funded Video Game From 1962

The launch of Sputnik prompted a U.S. government spending spree to achieve technological dominance over the Soviets. Among the recipients of this largesse were MIT engineers, who designed a computer simulation called Spacewar! Inspired by the sci-fi books of E.E. Smith, it was the world's first videogame. » 7/28/14 6:40am Yesterday 6:40am

Most Wearable Technology Has Been a Commercial Failure, Says Historian

Given the hype around wearable technology like Google Glass, you might be surprised to learn that the wristwatch is still the most successful example of modern wearable tech. Over the past century, wearables have mostly been commercial failures. A new book from MIT Press explores this forgotten history. » 7/21/14 4:42pm 7/21/14 4:42pm

Dorky, Snarky Artistic Interpretations of Famous Computer Viruses

In the fanciful "Computer Virus Catalogue," you'll find weird artistic interpretations of some of the most well-known computer viruses in history. They range from very literal to extremely surreal — and most capture the destructive, adolescent spirit that drives people to make viruses in the first place. (Mildly NSFW) » 7/16/14 6:12pm 7/16/14 6:12pm

A Great Way to Listen to Those Mysterious "Number Stations"

For decades, shortwave radio enthusiasts have been stumbling upon mysterious stations that broadcast a looping noise, such as a nursery rhyme, occasionally punctuated by someone reading a string of numbers. The most popular theory is that these are coded messages—and now, an online shortwave radio lets you listen in. » 7/15/14 3:06pm 7/15/14 3:06pm