Just Robbed A Vehicle In Mexico? You Might Have A Radiation Problem

There’s a bizarre crime wave afoot in Mexico, in which thieves are targeting trucks transporting radioactive materials. But before you suspect terrorists, know this: in all of the recent cases (three in the past 18 months, including one this week), the robbers had no idea what they were stealing. » 4/17/15 7:00pm Friday 7:00pm

This Baffling 1936 Murder Was Solved With A Hair And A Piece Of String

On April 10, 1936, the body of aspiring novelist Nancy Titterton was found raped and strangled to death (by her own pajamas) in the bathtub of the New York City apartment she shared with her husband, an executive at NBC. The only clues: a short length of cord and a single horsehair. » 4/17/15 4:20pm Friday 4:20pm

The Terrifying True Story Of America's Youngest Serial Killer

In 1872, 12-year-old Jesse Pomeroy was briefly sent to reform school after brutally attacking several children. After his release, “the Boy Fiend” progressed to murder. A new book takes a look at this unusual case, one of the first to bring the insanity defense — and all its complications — into the public eye. » 4/17/15 11:10am Friday 11:10am

A Forensic Photographer Explains The Fine Art Of Capturing A Crime Scene

Forensic photographer Nick Marsh discusses his 20-year career in David Beazley's five-minute documentary. Among the revelations: lighting, composition, and keeping an open mind are of utmost importance — and technology has actually harmed his profession by flooding the field with undertrained shutterbugs. » 4/16/15 9:00pm Thursday 9:00pm

Abraham Lincoln Autopsy Notes Reveal The Horror Of An Assassin's Gunshot

The Fenimore Art Museum in Cooperstown, NY just opened a new installation, "Autopsy for a Nation: The Death of Abraham Lincoln," marking the 150th anniversary of Lincoln's assassination. The exhibit's key items include handwritten notes by the physicians who conducted the President's autopsy. » 4/16/15 2:40pm Thursday 2:40pm

The 6 Most Utterly Insane Bank Heists In History

Is there a bank robbery that isn't at least a bit bizarre? Consider the "Geezer Bandit," who's held up at least 16 banks and is either an elderly man, or doing a convincing job imitating one. That's kind of weird, right? But it's small potatoes in the realm of bank-robbing. Here are six of history's most mind-boggling… » 4/13/15 10:00am 4/13/15 10:00am

Nearly 200 Years Ago, Awful Crimes Were Committed In This Lovely House

New Orleans visitors interested in macabre history are required to pass by the LaLaurie Mansion, located at 1140 Royal Street. Its genteel exterior masks its horrifying history, revealed 181 years ago today when a fateful fire broke out and the secrets within its walls were unleashed. » 4/10/15 8:00pm 4/10/15 8:00pm

Enormous Paintings Sliced From Their Frames Return Home To Bolivia

The long saga of two giant, colonial-era paintings — stolen from a Bolivian church in 2002 and unwittingly purchased in 2003 by New York collectors, who discovered they were stolen after loaning them for a 2013 exhibit — came full circle yesterday when they were unveiled at the government palace in La Paz. » 4/10/15 1:20pm 4/10/15 1:20pm

How A Note Attached To A Severed Sheep's Head Helped Solve A Murder

On April 9, 1984, Margaret Backhouse's car wouldn't start. Her husband, hairstylist-turned-sheep farmer Graham, quickly offered up his vehicle instead. But as soon as she turned the ignition, a bomb rocked the English countryside. Scandal — and impressive feats of forensic science — soon followed. » 4/09/15 3:34pm 4/09/15 3:34pm

The 7 Worst Attempts By Criminals To Blame Someone (Or Something) Else

Some crooks confess when they're caught, but most have trouble admitting what they've done — and sometimes, they go so far as to assign responsibility for their actions to someone or something else entirely. Here are seven instances in which criminals tried to pin the blame anywhere but on themselves. » 4/06/15 10:40am 4/06/15 10:40am

History's Lesser-Known Presidential Assassinations Were Utterly Gruesome

As countless films, books, and conspiracy theories have recounted, the presidencies of John F. Kennedy and Abraham Lincoln came to dramatic ends when the men were struck by assassins' bullets. Lesser-known are the deaths of James A. Garfield and William McKinley, who suffered the same fate, though both clung to life… » 4/04/15 12:00am 4/04/15 12:00am

Four Notorious Fugitives Who Were Caught — And One Who’s Still At Large

A fugitive can become a folk hero — or a desperate criminal whose acts become more terrifying the higher the stakes become. Sometimes, they can be both at once. Here, we present five different cases of men who managed to elude the law for years, even decades, before finally facing justice ... or not. » 3/27/15 3:42pm 3/27/15 3:42pm

Of Course The Origins Of The Term "Serial Killer" Are Gruesome

Unsurprisingly, the two men credited with coming up with the term "serial killer" worked, together and separately, on some of the FBI's most gruesome cases: John Douglas and Robert K. Ressler. Their careers were so extraordinary they influenced pop culture, and at least one Oscar-winning film. » 3/26/15 3:42pm 3/26/15 3:42pm