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The Real Story of Alfred Packer, the Wild West Cannibal Who Became An Unlikely Folk Hero

Alfred G. Packer first made headlines in 1873, when he returned from a harrowing journey through the Colorado Rockies ... alone. What happened to his five traveling companions became the stuff of legend, as author Harold Schechter explores in the new Man-Eater: The Life and Legend of an American Cannibal. » 8/18/15 5:00pm 8/18/15 5:00pm

Why Are Women Obsessed With Investigation Discovery’s Grisly TV Shows?

Jodie Gaines was 18 years old and on her way to a fish fry when she saw the blue lights of a cop car flash in her rearview. As detailed in an episode of House of Horrors: Kidnapped—one of a grip of ominously titled programs on the channel Investigation Discovery, the 24-7, true crime network—she was an outgoing high… » 8/18/15 10:58am 8/18/15 10:58am

Beyond Manson: A Celebration Of Another Bugliosi True-Crime Page-Turner

Everybody remembers that famed Manson Family prosecutor Vincent Bugliosi, who passed away this week at the age of 80, wrote Helter Skelter. But Bugliosi was a prolific author whose other volumes are well worth picking up — especially true-crime murder mystery And the Sea Will Tell. » 6/12/15 1:20pm 6/12/15 1:20pm

Recalling Another Famous Prison Break As The Search Continues For NY Duo

Behold “the Texas Seven,” violent convicts who escaped from Texas’ maximum-security John B. Connally Unit Prison on Dec. 13, 2000. You thought “Have a nice day” (with racist drawing) was an odd note to leave behind? The Texas Seven’s missive was far more ominous: “You haven’t heard the last of us yet.” » 6/11/15 5:00pm 6/11/15 5:00pm

The Tragedy Of The Gangster, The Gullible Girl, And The "Camera Gun"

It was December 1946, and 19-year-old Pearl Lusk was approached by a good-looking man in the Times Square subway station. He was a detective, he told the gullible lass, and he needed her help solving a case. Could she snap a photograph of a suspected thief with this unusual, uh, camera? » 6/11/15 10:30am 6/11/15 10:30am

A Charming Vintage Figurine Set That Memorializes A Famous Murder

The 1827 killing of Maria Marten came to be known as “the Red Barn Murder,” a crime so sensational that it spawned its own genre of art. And Red Barn Murder commemorations are still highly sought-after. Exhibit A: this charming ceramic rendering, which sold for nearly $20,000 in 2010.
» 6/09/15 1:20pm 6/09/15 1:20pm

Pakistani Supermodel Faces Scandalous Money-Laundering Charges

Pakistani fashion model Ayyan Ali (professionally, she goes by her first name only) was once dubbed Calvin Klein’s “Beauty of the Year,” but is now enduring a different kind of media attention since attempting to leave Islamabad with $500,000, well over the legal limit allowed passengers on flights. » 6/01/15 3:00pm 6/01/15 3:00pm

A Brief History Of Court TV, Where Many A True-Crime Obsession Was Born

If you have cable, you probably have TruTV, which specializes in comedy gags (Impractical Jokers) and clip shows (Top 20 Most Shocking). But truTV is a relatively new channel, having risen from the ashes of a network dedicated to picking over every detail of the highest-profile trials of the 1990s: Court TV. » 6/01/15 11:02am 6/01/15 11:02am

In 1780, America's First Mass Murder Was A Crime Of "Uncommon Horror"

He served under George Washington during the Revolutionary War. But Barnett Davenport made his mark on early America in far less heroic way: he’s remembered as the first known mass killer, a crime dubbed “the most horrid murders ever perpetrated in this country, or perhaps any other.” » 5/25/15 3:00pm 5/25/15 3:00pm

ID Network's First Scripted Drama Evokes Soap Operas And Ted Bundy

Investigation Discovery, or ID, is mostly known for its reenactment-heavy true-crime shows (including guilty-pleasure fodder like Wives With Knives, Momsters, and Frenemies: Loyalty Turned Lethal). The network’s first scripted series arrives in June with a suitably lurid title: Serial Thriller: Angel of Decay. » 5/22/15 12:40pm 5/22/15 12:40pm

Sweden's Most Bizarre Unsolved Murder Was (Maybe) Committed By A Vampire

Precious little information exists about what’s known as the Atlas Vampire Murder, so named for the neighborhood in Stockholm where it took place in 1932 ... and for the gruesome crime-scene details left behind by an unknown assailant. Quite obviously, the latter is why this long-cold case is still so tantalizing. » 5/21/15 5:00pm 5/21/15 5:00pm

Odd Disappearance Brings Back Memories Of "Most Terrible Crime Ever" 

In 1965, 16-year-old Sylvia Likens died after being tortured by her adult guardian — with the help of the woman’s family and other neighborhood children. The prosecutor called it “the most terrible crime ever committed in the state of Indiana.” Now, nearly 50 years later, Sylvia’s sister has mysteriously vanished. » 5/14/15 2:34pm 5/14/15 2:34pm