All humans and animals are getting fatter—and it's not the fatty food

All humans and animals are getting fatter—and it's not the fatty food

A 20-year scientific study has concluded that both humans and animals are getting fatter all across America. The reason is not the fatty food: even lab animals that live under strict control diets have been gaining 35 percent per decade. The scary thing is that scientists think that there may be "some widely shared cause, beyond the control of individuals, which is contributing to obesity across many species."

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Original post by Annalee Newitz on io9

This is not why you are fat

This is not why you are fat

People are getting fatter because they lack willpower and eat lots of sugary, fatty foods. Right? Actually, according to many scientists, it's wrong. The "obesity epidemic" is far more complicated than a snack attack. Especially when you consider humans aren't the only sufferers — monkeys are getting fatter, too.

Over at Aeon magazine, David Berreby reports from the front lines of the war on obesity, exposing its myths and offering some facts that will change the way you think about fat:

Consider, for example, this troublesome fact, reported in 2010 by the biostatistician David B Allison and his co-authors at the University of Alabama in Birmingham: over the past 20 years or more, as the American people were getting fatter, so were America’s marmosets. As were laboratory macaques, chimpanzees, vervet monkeys and mice, as well as domestic dogs, domestic cats, and domestic and feral rats from both rural and urban areas. In fact, the researchers examined records on those eight species and found that average weight for every one had increased. The marmosets gained an average of nine per cent per decade. Lab mice gained about 11 per cent per decade. Chimps, for some reason, are doing especially badly: their average body weight had risen 35 per cent per decade. Allison, who had been hearing about an unexplained rise in the average weight of lab animals, was nonetheless surprised by the consistency across so many species. ‘Virtually in every population of animals we looked at, that met our criteria, there was the same upward trend,’ he told me.

It isn’t hard to imagine that people who are eating more themselves are giving more to their spoiled pets, or leaving sweeter, fattier garbage for street cats and rodents. But such results don’t explain why the weight gain is also occurring in species that human beings don’t pamper, such as animals in labs, whose diets are strictly controlled. In fact, lab animals’ lives are so precisely watched and measured that the researchers can rule out accidental human influence: records show those creatures gained weight over decades without any significant change in their diet or activities. Obviously, if animals are getting heavier along with us, it can’t just be that they’re eating more Snickers bars and driving to work most days. On the contrary, the trend suggests some widely shared cause, beyond the control of individuals, which is contributing to obesity across many species.

You absolutely must read Berreby's entire essay over at Aeon.

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