Woman Develops Remarkable Ability To Draw After Suffering Brain Injury

Two years ago, Pip Taylor suffered serious bruising to her brain after tripping and cracking her head on a flight of stairs — an injury that now appears to have endowed her with an incredible ability to draw.

Pip Taylor, a 49-year old woman from England's Liverpool, claims she used to be "terrible" at drawing before the accident and was advised against being an artist at school.

Woman Develops Remarkable Ability To Draw After Suffering Brain Injury

An example of Taylor's drawing ability before her accident.

But during her half-year recovery period, Taylor bought a 2b pencil and a sketch pad in hopes that doodling would help pass the time.

That's when she realized could not just draw — but draw really well.

Woman Develops Remarkable Ability To Draw After Suffering Brain Injury

"It felt really natural in a way it hadn't before and I saw things in a different light," she is quoted in the UK Express. "I began to realize I had a real skill in being able to copy things accurately."

Woman Develops Remarkable Ability To Draw After Suffering Brain Injury

The UK Express spoke to Luke Griggs, a spokesperson for Headway — a brain injury association:

The effects of brain injury can be devastating, but we know that with the right help, at the right time, there can be life after brain injury. While different parts of our brain are responsible for different things, all parts of the brain are interconnected. Inhibition in one part of the brain following injury can lead to increased activity in other parts of the brain, which can sometimes result in surprising and unexpected effects. It is difficult to pinpoint the exact reasons behind Pip's fabulous new-found artistic ability but we are delighted she is enjoying her new hobby.

It's certainly possible that Taylor's accident is responsible for her new-found talent. It's also possible, of course, that she just naturally got better at drawing over time. As she admitted herself, it had been a while since she last doodled. But as noted by Griggs, brain injuries can change people, including their personalities, so this is not outside the realm of possibility.

[ UK Express via news.com.au | Images: CATERS]