The Time Activists Tried to Destroy GPS With an Axe in the 90s 

If you had heard of GPS in 1992, you likely heard about it because of the Gulf War. For the first time, GPS was used to precisely guide missiles to Iraqi targets. With this context in mind, it perhaps makes more sense why two activists would want to hack a GPS satellite to pieces. » 3/06/15 12:02am Today 12:02am

What Burger King's Super-Disturbing Mascot Teaches Us About Creepiness

Back in the mid-2000s, Burger King had a really unnerving ad campaign where a man in a plastic Burger King mask breaks into people's houses and watches them sleep. Over in the New Inquiry, Adam Kotsko uses the skin-crawling mascot, the King, as a jumping-off point to discuss the history of creepiness. » 3/02/15 2:27pm Monday 2:27pm

A Nerve-Wracking Glimpse At The Future Where Computers Think For Us

We already outsource our memories, calculations and a lot of our fact-checking to Google and other systems. But what happens when the computers start actually guessing what we're going to think before we think it? That's the subject of this unnerving flash fiction by Schlock Mercenary's Howard Tayler. » 2/19/15 10:51am 2/19/15 10:51am

Frank Drake: "It Would Be Silly" To Message Alien Life Today

Frank Drake, creator of the eponymous equation formulated to predict the probability of finding communicative extraterrestrial life in our galaxy, thinks that actively transmitting messages into outer space (as opposed to listening passively for extraterrestrial communication) is a silly, expensive, and inefficient… » 2/16/15 2:20pm 2/16/15 2:20pm

Yes, It Matters If The Science In Your Science Fiction Story Is Accurate

There's been a lot of debate lately over whether science fiction needs accurate science — or whether it's even worth discussing the accuracy of science in science fiction. What kind of person expects a science textbook instead of just a fun romp? But as a new essay points out, this is really a matter of suspension of… » 2/10/15 12:44pm 2/10/15 12:44pm

Diederik Stapel Recounts How He Became One Of Science's Biggest Frauds

In 2011, prominent social psychologist Diederik Stapel admitted to fabricating dozens of scientific studies. One year later, Stapel published Ontsporing ("Derailment"), a book about his rise and fall in the field of social psychology. Originally released in Dutch, Ontsporting has now been translated into English. » 1/23/15 4:04pm 1/23/15 4:04pm

If You See A Craigslist Ad For A Rift In The Universe, Don't Answer

There are a lot of strange things advertised on Craigslist... but the strangest of all might be one rift in the fabric of the universe, in the lost and found section. And this is just the first of many startling wonders being described online and in newspapers, in Kelly Sandoval's story "The One They Took Before." » 12/22/14 4:00pm 12/22/14 4:00pm

The Funniest Tolkien Article You'll Read This Week

We all know that J.R.R. Tolkien's famous fantasy books are merely translations of an ancient text, the Red Book of Westmarch. But what would happen if someone else tried to do their own translation? Could they get sued by the Tolkien estate and win? That's what this hilarious article in the Toast unravels for you. » 12/08/14 2:40pm 12/08/14 2:40pm