Blood Of 2 Million Babies Found In Indiana Warehouse

For over 20 years, the state of Indiana hoarded the blood of newborns without their parents' consent. If your child was born in Indiana after 1991, chances are his or her blood sample is one of an estimated 2.5-million specimens currently stored in a warehouse, the location of which state officials have not disclosed. » 7/19/14 2:00pm Saturday 2:00pm

I Am So Tempted to Say that These European Crows Are Racists

In Europe, there are two groups of crows who are almost identical — except for for thing. Carrion crows are all black, while hooded crows have patches of gray. Each group prefers to mate with their own color. It sounds like what humans would call racism, but instead it's a lesson in the limits of anthropomorphism. » 6/20/14 5:35pm 6/20/14 5:35pm

Craig Venter's new longevity startup will make "100 the new 60"

Biotechnologist Craig Venter — the first scientist to map the human genome and create synthetic life — now wants to dramatically extend the human lifespan. His new company, Human Longevity Inc., will use both genomics and stem cell therapies to help people stay healthy and vibrant for as long as possible. » 3/05/14 7:35am 3/05/14 7:35am

How DNA testing can rip families apart -- and bring them together

Two women from shattered homes have been using DNA tests to discover why they have always felt like outsiders. They find each other on a social network for people who want to compare their genomes — and they get a match. Are they related? Did their parents have an affair? New DNA services promise to help them find out. » 9/30/13 10:51am 9/30/13 10:51am

Scientists have finally sequenced the tiger genome!

For the first time, scientists have sequenced the genome of a tiger. And not just any tiger, but a Siberian tiger – the world's largest living felid. The researchers' just-published report includes a comparative analysis of the sequence with those of several other big cats, revealing molecular signatures for… » 9/18/13 9:15am 9/18/13 9:15am

Genetic evidence that humans' "default state" is not solitude

Environment plays a key role in how our genes behave. Now evidence is mounting that our social world is part of that environment, and that interpersonal connection shapes the gene expression in animals from bees to humans. In humans, a lack of social connection can even compromise the immune system. » 9/03/13 5:27pm 9/03/13 5:27pm

How an 1836 Famine Altered the Genes of Children Born Decades Later

Why do some identical twins look so different from each other? Could your eating habits during puberty have an impact on the genetic makeup of your grandkids? These are just two of the startling questions raised by the science of epigenetics, as this "deleted" chapter from David Epstein's book The Sports Gene explains. » 8/26/13 8:00am 8/26/13 8:00am

This glowing blue death worm could hold the key to human longevity

In an eerie discovery, we've found that dying worms emit an intense, blue glow that begins in their intestines before radiating outward into their entire bodies. Studying this "death fluorescence" allows researchers to understand how age-related death works in humans — and possibly, pathways to slowing it. » 7/23/13 3:20pm 7/23/13 3:20pm