How Americans Changed The Way Japanese People Ate Sushi

Sushi has taken on its own shape and form in the United States, but even before the first sushi restaurants opened up in California, America had an impact on the type of sushi eaten in Japan. During the American occupation after World War II, a food rationing program helped the rise of nigiri outside Tokyo. » 1/30/15 11:24am Friday 11:24am

A Day Of Remembrance For Lives Lost In the Pursuit Of Space

Today is Day of Remembrance for human spaceflight, a day selected for its proximity to horrific moments when we lost astronauts during our quest to explore our solar system. On January 28th, NASA takes the day to reflect on the lives lost during their missions when things went catastrophically, unexpectedly wrong. » 1/28/15 6:42pm Wednesday 6:42pm

All the faces of Ultron: The design evolution of the Avengers' archenemy

Outstanding illustration of the new Ultron on the cover of Empire this week. I remember how fascinated I was the first time I saw Ultron in Avengers. It was issue #162, published in 1977—I saw it much later because it arrived to Spain in the 80s. Here's how artists changed Ultron's appearance through the years: » 1/26/15 6:27pm Monday 6:27pm

Alan Turing's Hidden Manuscripts Are Up For Auction

Alan Turing was a British mathematician who both broke the infamous Enigma code, enabling Britain to stay alive during WWII, and also the father of computer science and artificial intelligence. He's the reason why people have laboured for decades to beat the 'Turing Test', and also the reason why submarines didn't… » 1/24/15 4:47pm 1/24/15 4:47pm

How A French Fashion Helped Beat An 18th-Century Anti-Vaxxer Movement

When the smallpox vaccine was first introduced in the 18th century, not everyone was eager to get inoculated. Many French people were suspicious of the new procedure, which was banned in Paris for five years. But after a celebrated royal inoculation, a new fashion helped advertise vaccination and ease vaccination… » 1/21/15 3:40pm 1/21/15 3:40pm

Oregon Was Founded As a Racist Utopia

When Oregon was granted statehood in 1859, it was the only state in the Union admitted with a constitution that forbade black people from living, working, or owning property there. It was illegal for black people even to move to the state until 1926. Oregon's founding is part of the forgotten history of racism in the… » 1/21/15 11:24am 1/21/15 11:24am

The Iron Maiden Was History's Most Brutal Imaginary Torture Device

The iron maiden was a horrible medieval torture device, a casket with spikes on the inside which could be closed slowly, impaling the living person inside. It was awful. It was also not real. It was a fake concept popularized by two men in the 19th century, an era not known for impaling people to death. » 1/16/15 9:20am 1/16/15 9:20am

British Library Fights To Preserve Historic Recordings Archive

As part of its vast collection of literary and historic treasures (the Magna Carta, Leonardo da Vinci's notebook), the British Library owns some six million sound recordings, including significant theater productions, famous voices (like J.R.R. Tolkien's), and field recordings of extinct animals. Some of them date… » 1/13/15 2:20pm 1/13/15 2:20pm